Effects of Therapist Positioning within Patient Preferred Live Music on Positive and Negative Affect, Pain, and Trust in the Therapist with Adults on a Cardiovascular Unit: A Three-Group Randomized Pilot Effectiveness Study
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Keywords

music therapy
patient preferred live music
therapist position
cardiovascular
positive and negative affect
pain
trust in the therapist

How to Cite

Mondek, M., & Silverman, M. (2020). Effects of Therapist Positioning within Patient Preferred Live Music on Positive and Negative Affect, Pain, and Trust in the Therapist with Adults on a Cardiovascular Unit: A Three-Group Randomized Pilot Effectiveness Study. Voices: A World Forum for Music Therapy, 20(1). https://doi.org/10.15845/voices.v20i1.2710

Abstract

Background: Although patient preferred live music (PPLM) can improve mood and pain with hospitalized adult medical patients, there is a lack of literature concerning therapist positioning within PPLM interventions.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of therapist positioning within PPLM on positive and negative affect, pain, and trust in the therapist with adults on a cardiovascular unit.

Methods: Participants (N = 27) were randomly assigned to one of three single-session conditions: PPLM delivered with the therapist sitting, PPLM delivered with the therapist standing, or wait-list control. Positive and negative affect were measured with the Global Mood Scale, pain was measured with a 10-point Likert-type scale, and trust in therapist was measured with the Wake Forest Physician Trust Scale.

Results: Results indicated no significant between-group difference in positive affect, negative affect, or pain. Control participants had the lowest posttest positive affect scores and highest posttest negative affect and pain scores, indicating that both PPLM conditions had more favorable results than the control condition. Concerning trust in the therapist, there was no significant between-group difference resultant of therapist positioning.   

Conclusion: Regardless of the therapist’s positioning, a single PPLM session can be an effective intervention for immediately improving positive and negative affect and pain for adult inpatients on a cardiovascular unit. Implications for clinical practice, limitations, and suggestions for future research are provided.  

Keywords: music therapy, patient preferred live music, cardiovascular, positive and negative affect, pain, trust in the therapist

https://doi.org/10.15845/voices.v20i1.2710
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Copyright (c) 2020 Mackenzie Mondek, Michael J. Silverman, Dr.

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