A Pilot Study Investigating Research Design Feasibility Using Pre-post Measures to Test the Effect of Music Therapy in Psychiatry with People Diagnosed with Personality Disorders
Niels hannibal, Inge Nygaard Pedersen, Lars Ole Bonde, Lars Rye Bertelsen
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Keywords

pilot study
personality disorder
process oriented music therapy
mentalization-based treatment

How to Cite

Hannibal, N., Nygaard Pedersen, I., Bonde, L., & Bertelsen, L. (2019). A Pilot Study Investigating Research Design Feasibility Using Pre-post Measures to Test the Effect of Music Therapy in Psychiatry with People Diagnosed with Personality Disorders. Voices: A World Forum for Music Therapy, 19(1). https://doi.org/10.15845/voices.v19i1.2731

Abstract

Introduction: The objectives of the pilot study were (a) to investigate the feasibility of the research design (referral procedure, data collection procedure, measurement tools, and treatment doses/frequency); (b) to develop and evaluate the PROMT treatment manual; and (c) to test the use of flexible and or multiple interventions as part of the treatment options. Findings from this investigation aim to prepare for a future outcome study of music therapy treatments for patients with personality disorders, that are inspired by analytically oriented music psychotherapy and mentalization-based treatment.

Methods: Four participants assessed and diagnosed with personality disorder received 40 sessions of individual music therapy. Pre and post measures of outcome variables looking at attachment style, helping alliance, symptom severity, interpersonal problems, and quality of life were evaluated for inclusion in the design. Interviews with clinicians were used to further evaluate the manual.

Results: All participants completed treatment. Outcome measurement provided usable information and also showed some positive changes in the four cases. The research design was found to be usable for a larger study. The treatment manual was evaluated as usable, but specification on how to use mentalization-based treatment in music-based interventions is required in a future manual.

Discussion: In light of the current findings, we discuss several factors relevant to a possible future outcome study, including the research design, theoretical model, and specific elements of the treatment manual. We also discuss the potential of using flexible and/or multiple interventions as part of the treatment options. We conclude that integration of mentalization-based treatment into music therapy seems promising, but further development of the treatment manual is needed.

https://doi.org/10.15845/voices.v19i1.2731
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Copyright (c) 2019 Niels Hannibal, Inge Nygaard Pedersen, Lars Ole Bonde, Lars Rye Bertelsen

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