Robert Gross

The Social Model of Disability and Music Therapy: Practical Suggestions for the Emerging Clinical Practitioner

Robert Gross

Abstract


More and more music therapists are becoming aware of the social model of disability. The social model of disability maintains that the locus of disability rests in the capacity for society to create barriers for people with physical or mental differences. Much of music therapy practice still invests in the medical model of disability, which maintains that disability is an inherent personal flaw in the individual which requires remediation. This paper argues that music therapy practice should adopt the social model of disability, and maintains that, in particular, music-centered music therapy is one theory of music therapy that resonates well with the social model of disability. The paper includes advice for the emerging music therapy clinician on how better to incorporate social model of disability perspectives in practice based on the work of previous scholars who have written extensively about the social model.


Keywords


disability; social model of disability

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15845/voices.v18i1.958

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