Vaillancourt, Da Costa, Han and Lipski

An Intergenerational Singing Group: A Community Music Therapy Qualitative Research Project and Graduate Student Mentoring Initiative

Guylaine Vaillancourt, Danna Da Costa, Evie (Yi) Han, Gloria Lipski

Abstract


This study describes the implementation and investigation of a community music therapy (CoMT) intergenerational singing group. Participants were a non-clinical group of adults aged 20 to 65 years old. Weekly sessions were held over a 10-week period at a community art studio in a lower-income neighborhood within a large Canadian urban city. Participants reported experiencing increased self-expression, a sense of accomplishment, improved respiration, and feelings of general well-being. They developed new relationships and social and community networks, however participants mentioned limitations regarding the sustainability of this community development. They also indicated challenges with the multilingual repertoire. Three professional music therapy graduate students, acting as co-researchers, were introduced to and mentored in implementing community music therapy practice and research. Potential implications and recommendations for further research are discussed.


Keywords


Community music therapy; intergenerational; singing group; community; graduate students

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15845/voices.v18i1.883

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