Music Technology Tools – A Therapist-in-a-box?
Photo of author Kjetil Høyer Jonassen
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Keywords

Music technology
iPad
agency
co-creation
mental health and wellbeing

How to Cite

Jonassen, K. (2021). Music Technology Tools – A Therapist-in-a-box?. Voices: A World Forum for Music Therapy, 21(2). https://doi.org/10.15845/voices.v21i2.3308

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the discussion of technology in music therapy and public health, focusing on the human–computer interaction and the cocreation of mental health. Foundational theory explaining the possible therapeutic dynamics that can occur when engaged in digital technology is presented, along with two case vignettes that illustrate how adolescents interact with digital music technology to promote mental health and wellbeing. The discussion includes reflections concerning actor-network theory, agency, and affordance-theory, and it argues that the iPad should be considered a valuable co-agent in the agent-network functioning to promote adolescents’ mental health.

https://doi.org/10.15845/voices.v21i2.3308
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Copyright (c) 2021 Kjetil Høyer Jonassen

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