Roots and Branches of the European Network of Guided Imagery and Music (ENGIM)
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Keywords

GIM
Helen Bonny

How to Cite

Wärja, M. (2010). Roots and Branches of the European Network of Guided Imagery and Music (ENGIM). Voices: A World Forum for Music Therapy, 10(3). https://doi.org/10.15845/voices.v10i3.559

Abstract

During the last decade the GIM community of Europe has grown considerably. I undertook my own training in the early 90´s at The Bonny Foundation of Music-Centered Therapies in Kansas with Helen Bonny, Lisa Summer and Fran Goldberg as inspiring teachers. I was the first Swedish GIM Fellow and in 1998 I became the first European Primary Trainer. In twelve years we have grown to now include eleven Primary GIM Trainers working around Europe. With more trainers come more students and more Fellows! In this time period there has been a movement towards developing a European organization of GIM.

             I will describe the gradual growth of the European community into the European Network of GIM (ENGIM) and the efforts of the appointed ENGIM steering committee, while taking into account the support garnered from the Association for Music and Imagery (AMI, the American GIM organization) and Helen Bonny, herself. 

https://doi.org/10.15845/voices.v10i3.559
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